Morning links

Google reveals it received secret FBI subpoena, known as a National Security Letter, in the first half of 2015.  NSLs come with an automatic gag order, that may eventually be lifted by the government, or never lifted at all: “Government watchdogs have criticized the FBI for abusing national security letters multiple times over the years — for restricting First Amendment protected speech, failing to provide enough evidence to make the requests, and targeting a massive number of Americans without notifying them or giving them the chance for redress. The provisions in the Freedom Act were meant to address some concerns — including what many have argued are unconstitutionally lengthy gag orders.”

Koch Bros. fund pro-surveillance, pro-war Senate candidates

Pipeline activist shot with rubber bullet while being interviewed on-camera

Drunken cop caught on video beating his K9 partner outside a casino. The cop was given “administrative leave”, or as the article points out, paid vacation, for the badged, subhuman piece of garbage you see in the video.  He was eventually fired, only to be reinstated in late October.  The judge argued that it was only his first offense, thereby putting citizens in danger from a confirmed violent, alcoholic criminal.  But, then again, cops don’t really mind violence against dogs at all, do they?

Legal marijuana is more popular than ever in the US, but bureaucratic barriers to studying the medicinal benefits are frustrating researchers

Speaking of marijuana, California will almost certainly legalize recreational pot on November 8th.

Jeffrey Tucker makes a convincing case for allowing children to work again: “A century ago, we invented a system that imagined children as civic soldiers. Kids bolted to chairs with absolutely no skin in the game have abstract “information” pounded into their heads by tax-paid instructors who teach from state-approved books.

We push these kids through the system and deny them any chance to realize their human value in gainful employment in a community of productivity and real learning. Then we tell them to scrape together $100,000 for yet another degree that will somehow gain them entry into the workforce, but all these demoralized and cynical kids end up with is an empty CV and 15 years of debt.”

Would President Trump free Julian Assange? Justin Raimondo ponders. (I remain doubtful)

FBI opens investigation into one of its own Twitter accounts

Contrary to the rising cacophony of political opinion, this is the least-important election of our lifetime, says Daniel Harsanyi